Film

Vintage Tuesday: Landscape Vintage Slides

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vintage slidesLast year I made Victor a slide lamp with landscape vintage slides with voyages from around the world, including the Great Wall of China. I found the perfect selection of slides for him out of my collection for his travelling spirit. Before I make anything with slides I always scan them as I hate the idea of the photo be lost forever so here is look at some of slides I used on his lamp from various people! Ps. If you are interested on how I made the slide lamp, check out my DIY here.

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How To: Organize Your Polaroid Film

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how to organize instant film (8)I have a massive amount of Polaroids and over the years I’ve discovered a few ways for organizing and storing them so I thought I’d share. As the film is no longer common these days there is not a lot products available for storing the film and in fact almost all of my organizers were not intended to be used for Polaroid film. A big distinction I want to mention is when  I say Polaroids I am referring to  pack film whether it’s Polaroid pack film or the Fujifilm FP-3000B or FP-100C variety (which is still made) and not the other types of Polaroid film. I’ll also be giving tips on how to store your negatives for pack film, if like me you like to keep them instead of throwing them away.

Organize Your Polaroid Film

how to organize instant film (1)I use every one of these to store and organize my film and negatives at home and when I am out shooting with my vintage Polaroid cameras. Below I break them down in seperate categories of what they are best for and where to find them.

Practical & On the Go

how to organize instant film (5)To be honest this is 90% of what I use for my storage, it’s not the best looking solution but it functions perfectly and for someone who takes a lot of instant photographs it’s very easy to manage and affordable. These are Print File Archival Negative Pages ($10 for 25 pages) which I just put inside a normal 3 ring binder. If you are just storing the film you can put several in each 4×5 pocket because the pack film is actually smaller than the pockets, which also makes for easy removal.  If you want use the pages for display you can fit 8 pieces of film on one page using the front and back side. The clear plastic makes it easy to see and no PVC means its great long term storage. I also use these pages, minus the binder when I am outside shooting. I simply bring along as many pages as I need and slip into my bag. The pages fold up easily so you can get it down to the size of just 1 pocket making it easy to bring along. After I’m done taking a photo on my camera I’ll wait for the film to dry and slip it inside one of the pockets. This makes sure my film stays free of dirt, does not touch anything else, and if it isn’t completely dry the worst it will do is stick to the plastic which in my case has never wrecked the film as you can effortlessly peel them apart. Two things to note when using these pages while on the go is that they will collect dirt over time so you will need to replace them after a while and the pages will not prevent the film bending so you want to make sure you are putting these somewhere flat. In my camera bag I put the pages in between the cushion and the outside part of my bag, folded up together, haven’t had a issue with bent photos yet.

Decorative:

how to organize instant film (7)The classic way or decorative way for storage is a photo album. You can use modern albums or vintage like I have here in the above shot. Vintage Polaroid photo albums are easy to find online and thrift shopping. I picked up this cute 70s album on Etsy for $10 (examples here) and two plain leather ones for a few dollars locally. They provide affordable storage and very charming at the same time. Keep in mind though that Polaroid film comes in many different sizes, for pack film the perfect album has pockets sized 3 ½ x 4 ¼. Most vintage albums will be this size or large on average so if you don’t mind a bit of extra room there isn’t many that will not work, just avoid square shaped pockets as they are not for pack film and likely too small. You can see in the photo above these vintage albums are great as well for holding smaller vintage photography! Modern albums are made for 4×6  film so technically pack film will fit but I prefer the two above options more. For photography portfolios however I like using Portfolio Nobel albums which come in all different sizes, the smallest being 4×6 or 5×7, I simply use photo corners to keep the Polaroids centered.

Negative Storage:

When I am out taking photos with my Polaroid I always like to keep the negative side whether I am shooting in black and white or color. So to make sure I can carefully carry back all negatives home I use a simple plastic sheet protector that you can get cheap from any office supplies store, or Dollar store. It can be folded up neatly in any bag before use and doesn’t take up any space at all.  Once it has negatives in it what it does is protect my bag and camera equipment from getting any of emulsions and developing goo on them, and only takes up as much room as the negatives. The sheet protector is also long enough to fit the whole back side of the Polaroid including the negative and the paper tab without trimming. This is really important especially if you are shooting and don’t have the time, or the ability to let the negatives dry completely. I normally don’t putting them in completely wet but I have, even with two negatives at once facing away from each other and not had an issue. They will stick to the plastic and stay a little moist but if you must…it’s a great way to get them home. The plastic protector will get dirty with the chemicals after several uses but you can wash it or throw away if it’s too far gone.

how to organize instant film (3)Once I am home I like to store the pre-negatives in a plastic container until I have a chance to clean and turn them into proper negatives (only with color pack film – black and white you can scan right away).  I picked up this plastic storage container made for 4×6 photography from an art store for a few dollars, it fits the negatives perfectly without me needing to trim the sides or tab. It can sometimes take a few months for me to process them so it’s nice to have a large container to store them in the meantime. You can also use this for storing the film while out shooting but it takes up a larger area, however it’s great for a long vacation when you want to store film in your suitcase.  For storing the negatives after processing them, I use the same Print File pages again and store in a binder.  I’ve actually wanted to do a tutorial on how to make the back side of pack film into negatives for over a year and never get around to putting all my thoughts together but if you interested and don’t currently do this with yours here one video and another as a guide.

I hope this was helpful! I know when I first started shooting with vintage Polaroid cameras I had no idea how to organize them or store them safely when I was shooting. One time I put my film in-between the pages of my camera manual thinking the film was completely dried and ended up ripping out two pages of the manual as the pages got stuck to the emulsion. Wrecking my vintage manual for the camera and the photo almost entirely, since then I have never trusted pack film to ever be dry no matter how dry it feels. With these organizers I’m really happy with my the safety of my film when I’m shooting and know it’ll get home fine, not to metion how easy it is to find a photo I need in my big binder. If you have any questions about this ask below and please share any tips or suggestions you have!






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Vintage Tuesday: Looking Back

Posted by Citizen Erased in Black & White Photography, Film, Vintage Tuesday | 4 Comments

family vintage photography

When I look back at 1900s photography it’s always with great fondness and admiration, however it’s a whole another thing to ‘know’ the people in the photos. I’ve never really had a close relationship with my family, especially my grandparents on either side so I really missed out being able to go through their photo albums and in their later years discovering more about them as an adult. The only impression about my grandmother’s side of the family besides knowing they were German famers in Alberta who lived in a mostly Ukraine populated area was the cameo portraits my grandmother had in her room of her great grandparents I believe. I loved look at them so much because they were very striking and regal and very much of a moment of history, that moment before photography became the way we captured ourselves instead of oil on canvas. Much to my delight I was given a few scans of that side of the family, dating from the early 1900s, like the above photo of my grandmother’s grandparents. There aren’t many photos from the war times so the ones below will be from the 1940s to 1950s but I thought I’d show the great photography of my one side of family today.

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My grandmother, who is in most of these photos is a small child with her older sister Trudie and other family members like her parents. Mostly taken in Southern Alberta where they lived.
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I will definitely be sharing some more another time, as I love these. The one of my grandmother and the bear that close is surreal. She always love camping and I can see why now. Let me know in the comments below if you have any great photos to remember your grandparents or great grandparents by.

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Vintage Tuesday: Long Beach in Polaroids

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Long Beach on Vancouver Island is one of the few places in Canada I’ve been that feels like nowhere else.  Situated in the Pacific Rim area of the island sandwiched between two small holiday towns (Tofino and Uculelet) and surrounded by the rainforest, it’s pretty magical. Not to mention there is nothing between it and the raw span of the Pacific ocean that reaches all the way to Japan. It feels like a raw untapped environment, the bear lockers as well certainly back that up. The highway trip there however might persuade you not to visit; we twisted and turned constantly through the mountains for a few hours to get to this secluded area of the island. Even after only being there twice in my lifetime once as a kid and an adult I feel a connection with the place. If you ever get the chance or plan a trip to Vancouver Island – I’d say jump on it. These were all taken with my Polaroid Super Shooter Shot using Fujifilm FP-100C film instant film.

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Vintage Tuesday: 1900s Photography

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vintage photography collectionIn the last two weeks I’ve went to a local flea market, Marche Aux Puces a few times and without fail (and not intending to buy any) brought home with me a few pieces of vintage photography to add to my collection. Victor scolded me while he was waiting for me to go through the piles and piles of photos this one storefront had, saying “why do you need more?” and it really struck me. Vintage photography beyond just being wonderful to look at and good for admiring it’s beauty, should in theory be meaningless if you don’t know the people or even what landscape is in the photo…however that’s not the case to me at all. I find each piece has its own draw and reason why I’d like to own it. Not to mention as a photographer I like the idea of preserving vintage photography on top of when I see what poor conditions some sellers keep it in I  feel a little like I should ‘rescue’ it.  Beside the two points I already mentioned – there is actually a ton of other reasons why I like old photography so instead of just showing what photos I choose to buy I thought this time I’d share why below each to give more context why I pick certain photographs.

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Landscape photography is harder to find when thrifting so anytime I find it’s almost always an immediate buy each time. I prefer landscape photography over portraits in fact, but it’s wasn’t common pre 1950’s for people to take it unless they were professionals The left appears to be a lake, and there is an anomaly in the photo between the waves that I can’t for the life of me figure out what it is – and it’s definitely not damage (enlarge and have a guess in the comments if you want because I still have no idea).  The right is from 1958 and appears to be Niagara Falls. 

vintage photography 1900s montreal (10)Never really fond of wedding photography but I was struck by the detail on her veil and the crowd around them. Plus I am a sucker for square photos being a long time Holga fan.

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One of the first ones I was drawn to while searching through the piles was this blurry group shot due to its distinct character. Normally I avoid bad photography but this blur of wedding guests or church goers or snappy dressers is very intriguing to me. 

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Is it bad if I say I bought this one because she’s wearing a swimsuit and/or no pants? She has a wonderful rueful expression on her face and a part of me really needs to know what she’s doing up there on the post.  The left over tape is a negative but the quality of the seller’s photos in general was really poor – not shown a lot of love.  

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Children are another one of my favourite subjects when it comes to vintage photography. Something about the black and white, style of clothes and often weird expressions combined that I find unnerving. Nothing beats a spooky photo of a child. This photo is just a really nice shot but I like how the over exposure also makes her look like she only has one arm.

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Finding double exposures give me great joy, I don’t have many but slowly I want to build an entire collection of just interesting double exposures.  This shot almost looks like a nice view of a lake and boat until you realize the sky has waves on it.

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The stoic stance and hair style are a must. When it comes to men I am all about a good moustache but I love finding good fashion and hairstyles of women.

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1928 at a parc I can’t put my name on but I am sure I’ve visited myself here in Montreal (who knows what flight of fancy that is). The 1920’s was a great time for fashion, you don’t find many from that time period, 1940’s-1950’s are more common.

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Small photos and square photos are some of the photos I am always tempted to buy, this one was developed to be exposure only in a heart shape which makes it’s 1×2 inch size even more precious. The first non standard developed photo to my collection.  

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Although extremely over exposure what Canadian can say no to a photo of a hockey team? Secretly hoping there is someone famous in the photo who will make it worth the big bucks, lol.

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Sailor hats and an ass joke – men are always boys aren’t they?

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Patterned paper I believe is from 1940’s during the popularity of art deco movement, I buy almost any I can find because I love the detail. This is my creepiest children photo from the set.

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A postcard style photograph from around the 1920’s of what appears to be an all boys school. This photos has amazing details, I included a close up of their faces so it’s easier to see the details as I downsize the quality of my scans for the website.
  More below the link






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Lomography Wednesday: Camping & Long Beach

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lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (15)I am sharing photos from my Vancouver trip piece by piece, there is something about summer that makes me never feel the need to relive it a second time…that is until Winter hits and the first snow falls and then all I do is look at photos of better and nicer days and pine away. lol. All the instant photographs today were taken with my Instax Mini 90 camera using Pandora film while me and Victor were on our trip.  We really wanted to go camping on Vancouver Island while in town and my friend Brent agreed to drive so we hit the road 2 days into landing in Vancouver. Me and Victor spent the next 6 days camping at various places across the island.

lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (11)Our second location of the camping trip was Long Beach on the west coast of the island. The sky was blotched out due to the heavy smoke from a forest fire on the north side of the island that happened on the 2nd day of our camping adventure. The lower mainland and the island were having a severe drought so fires are to be expected. We didn’t know until we arrived back to Vancouver that the whole of lower mainland had the same issue with the sky just being a sea of smoke. I remember once having black ash fall from the sky in downtown Vancouver one year after a really bad forest fire which didn’t feel as bizarre to me as this. It’s just what happens when you are in province with so much forest and dry summers. So we didn’t really get a sunny beach while camping but I loved the atmosphere. Below is a double exposure shot of the beach and a few of us hanging out.

lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (12) lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (5)lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (13)Sadly I didn’t get any photos of us wave surfing as a group but we spent most of our day on Long Beach doing that with my friend Zara who joined us there. The water was very cold especially with no sun to warm us up but we had a blast. We also headed down to the beach later that day to watch the sunset together. I hate when I take photos of sunsets with the Instax camera the sun becomes a black dot in the skyline  (like the second photo below).

lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (6) lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (14)lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (10)Due to the drought most of BC had a fire ban which all three of us didn’t even think about before heading out camping. Lucky for us we just happened to have packed a gas stove or it might have been a disaster. However at Long Beach they didn’t have a ban on camps fires due to being so close to the ocean.  We made the biggest fire we could! It was so nice to cook supper over it (man I love anything cooked over a fire) and I must have spent a good hour roasting marshmallows.

lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (7)Our 3rd camping location was the beautiful island of Newcastle which is just adjacent to Nanaimo’s downtown harbour. When I was little and lived in Nanaimo my school use to go over to Newcastle to hike all the time and even do group camping. I couldn’t wait to take Victor and show him as I have a fondness of the place. Sadly our friend Brent had to get back to work so he dropped us off so we could hop on the small ferry over to the island. The first night we arrived the sun was just setting so we didn’t do much except setup camp and eat a quick supper but the next morning we made the big plan to walk around the entire island. It was intense and it took 5 hours but being able to view the ocean from the cliff sides and even have lunch dangling my feet over a cliff was well worth it.

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Late on our last night of camping my older brother showed up with his girlfriend and we proceeded to show them the coastline of the island. We didn’t get to go very far since me and Victor were exhausted from our own walk but the next morning on our last day we took them up the side of the island that we thought was the most beautiful. Victor and my brother were on the hunt to find the perfect private beach to sit and chill at. We did find in the end after a lot of walking and even scrabbling down the side of rocks, lots of hand hold and finding a path down with the least amount of thorn bushes.  All the photos are us hanging out on the secluded beach and enjoy the morning breeze coming off the ocean. Victor even went for a swim at the end to capitalize on our last hour on Newcastle before we headed back to Vancouver.

lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (8) lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (9)lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (4)lomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (3)I am surprised I didn’t take more photos on our 6 day trip camping but I love the ones I did and have a few more from the whole trip which maybe I’ll share in a few weeks’ time.






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Lomography Wednesday: Summer Vibes

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I am dubbing the follow photos Summer Vibes because all of them are just taken on various times just chillin’ in the last few weeks. All were taken with my Instax Mini 90 using Instax Hamicat film, which is hysterical to me even though I have no fucking clue who Hamicat is (let me know in the comments if you are familiar).  I mean the watermelon photo below is just beyond BEYOND cute and strange at the same time. Not to mention the one of Hamicat – a cartoon cat as you can imagine and his mouse buddy just getting drunk (6 one down). This just might be the best Instax film to date, at least to me. Lol. Enjoy my silly summer photos.

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We went to Techno Beach as Victor likes to call it (it’s actually called  Village Éphémère) this weekend for the first time. The music was not exactly what we expected, I guess they have different types throughout the summer and we went on a salsa, folk music with a beat night. However it was still a pretty nice place to hang out and watch the sunset not to mention just a short bike ride from our house.

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I love the food truck night they have at Pie-X. This is Victor chowing down on a bacon sandwich which I am pretty sure used a whole pack of bacon. I can’t believe we didn’t even have food carts a few years ago…well we still kind of don’t as they are usually only operating in the summer months and have specific destinations. So you don’t really spot them too frequently outside of this event and festivals which is too bad since I love trying new food (or just getting sausages from the Polish van – probably the best thing ever is polish sausages).

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Sometimes I don’t realize until I finish a roll how much I just shoot Victor, I mean it’s understandable because we are attached at the hip when not working but after a while it’s kind of like….oh another photo of Victor. lol. No, just me? Rambling aside, a fun day at the beach playing my new card game I picked up on Kickstarter called Exploding Kittens (going to do a review of it in September).

hamicat instax mini film (2)hamicat instax mini film (5)These last few are from Vancouver on my last day at the BBQ we had at my friend’s Nicole house. My best friend Ana and my friend Brent (who people keep saying we look related – we are not).

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 Let me know in the comment what you think about this awesome film design?






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Lomography Wednesday: Spring in Instant

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spring instax mini film (14)Today I’m sharing with you all the instant photography that I took using my Instax Mini 90 this Spring. You might recognize the characters on the film itself if you’ve ever seen Little Twin Star before. I love being able to use themed Instax mini film when I get the chance, it’s just so cute and adorable although probably not very suitable for the photos I ended up taking with it (it was all I had at the time). All of these shots were taken back in May and April from several different trips.  Most of them feature the Vieux-Montreal & Plateau area where I frequently go for bike rides and picnics and show things like the Jacques-Cartier Bridge, Clock tower, Parc Lafontaine and silos. A few double exposures as well which I’m not yet sold on with this camera. I notice the double exposures tend to usually be over exposed no matter what time of day/lighting conditions I am taking the shots in. I still haven’t done my review of the Instax Mini 90 either, hope to finish it by the end of the summer. Anyways, to the photos…

spring instax mini film (17) spring instax mini film (9) spring instax mini film (4)spring instax mini film (1) spring instax mini film (5) spring instax mini film (10)spring instax mini film (21) spring instax mini film (13) spring instax mini film (18) spring instax mini film (22)Oh and just in case you were wondering, I had 1 shot of Hello Kitty leopard Instax mini film left in my camera so this is the one shot of it from the same trip as the one above it. We went for a picnic at the Sir Wilfred Laurier parc with almond croissants from my favourite bakery – yum.

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Lomography Wednesday: Organizing Instax Film

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organizing instax film (1)Anytime you have a film camera the evitable question is how do I organize all my shots after I’ve taken them? Thought I’d do one specifically for organizing Instax mini films today as I’ve already done a ‘How To’ for organizing negatives (here) and plan on doing one for Polaroid film soon. Plus there is a lot you can do with Instax film and it’s great to get creative. Hope you find this information help, and let me know in the comments if you have your own suggestions!

organizing instax film (2)Albums:

My first tip is the most obvious for organizing, ALBUMS. It’s easy to find albums online and in fact they are pretty affordable but my biggest tip is to buy off of Ebay. Like with any Instax mini accessory I always recommend looking on Ebay because North American just isn’t as into Instax cameras as much as people in Japan, Korea and other countries in China. So unless you live there, it’s the best way to see what they have. What they have that you won’t find anywhere is variety and price. Whether that meas color, patterns and even album material and size (albums for 24 shots, 64 shots, 84 shots, and even over 100+ ). I even have a Little Twin Star album that matches some of the film I have and all of them I bought for around $5 each with free shipping. All the albums I have except the mini album are 64 shots, my favourite being the two faux leather albums. If you don’t like Ebay,  Amazon America (Canada’s is terrible still) has been getting way more variety in albums the last few months than they use to, although usually more expensive.

organizing instax film (5)organizing instax film (4)organizing instax film (3)organizing instax film (6)Alternatives:

If you want another way to organize/show you Instax film here are 4 ideas that I think can be really fun. The best, and one I love the most is photo walls. Simply use tack, tape, pins or anything really and stick the film on the wall. I’ve made them with other types of film in the past but right now I prefer having artwork on my walls instead, so here are a few awesome Instax walls for reference (here, here, and here). Second idea if you want a bit more structure that will probably be less damaging to your walls use Fotoclips. They are made to be used to any type of film and are great if you are worried about the film curling up. Third is the wall sheet which fits 10 or 20 shots that can be hanged on the wall or used as a curtain. I bought a bunch of them with the idea of making them into curtains but haven’t really used them yet. Check out this photo to see what it’d look like, also useful if you don’t want dirt or dust getting on your photos. The fourth idea is more for protective storage but you can use card protectors which just happen to be the same size of Instax mini film.

organizing instax film (7)Travel:

My biggest concern when I first got my Instax Mini 90 camera was how the hell do I store the film when I’m out taking shots or while I’m waiting for them to develop. A lot can happen between then and getting home sometimes and you don’t want to ruin that perfect shot you just took before you even have time to share it. My favourite and most reliable way to store Instax film when out of the house is the mini album. The reason why it’s amazing is because it’s tiny enough to fit in most of my purses and camera bags and will not become an inconvenience like a bigger album (belows shot is so you can compare a mini album to a medium sized one). It also means your film will not get bent, and it holds 24 shots which for me mean I can take it for weekend trip like camping and have plenty of room to store all my shots in. Other alternatives can be the photo wall I showed above which is about the same size as the mini album except it’s a tad longer but much skinner; or the card protectors which are great if you are mostly worried about the film getting dirty and want to slip it into a pocket or bags. The only down side to both of them is the film can get bent.

organizing instax film (8)Storage:

Well storage can be anything, but I love these hipster wooden cases and wanted to share them. I just picked up my own in both styles and can’t wait for them to arrive.






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Vintage Tuesday: Childhood Photos

Posted by Citizen Erased in Film, Vintage Tuesday | Leave a comment

Unexpected at the start of the month my brother sent me a big packaged filled with all these wonderful gifts he picked up for me in India along with a usb drive containing scans of film photographs from my childhood. Some of them I hadn’t seen if over a decade and some I’d never seen before, so you can imagine it a bit of a head trip. Victor and I must have spent 3 hours around his computer one night after the package arrived, going through all the photos and me telling him random stories behind them. It was really nice especially since it made me remember things I had forgotten about.  I choose to share this group of photos because one of the cooler things I had a chance to do as a kid was visit my father at his work.

childhood photos chetwynd (1)My father lived in this tiny town called Chetwynd in Northern BC and worked at the lumber mill as a forester. Basically he was in charge of restoring the area after they were deforested. Although I did hate spending part of my summer stuck in the small town, it was pretty fun when we were allowed to go with him for the day. For a city kid being able to ride around the mountains in a four wheeler when I didn’t even own my own bike was surreal. I always had a mixture of fear and excitement while driving on my own four wheeler or even sitting on the back of one with my brother’s driving. I can’t believe now that I was even allowed to drive, I pretty sure I am only 8 in these photos. That’s probably a normal age for kids who live in rural areas, maybe? I also remember loving to just hunting in the middle of a deep forest for fossils (I found them too, my collection of fossils was small but I treasured each one). My favourite pass time though while on site with him was finding and trying to kiss random frogs. I must have taken fairy tales a bit too seriously since otherwise that just makes me really weird for doing that…a lot.  My two brothers and I also use to plant trees anytime we went out with him. I have no idea why we found it so fun. Most people who were there to plant trees were University students on break in need of money spending 10 hours a day breaking their back planting hundreds of trees a day. I probably planted like 20 in the span of 6 hours so I guess I didn’t experience what it was really like. We use to just wander around a lot while my dad checked up on the tree planters. In between different sites he’d take us to  waterfalls and anything else interesting he thought would keep us preoccupied while he was working. The last thing I remember doing while visiting was each summer we’d ride in a helicopter. My dad frequently had to be lifted into certain areas to survey by helicopter so every summer we visited he’d arrange for us to be taken up in helicopter as well. Sometimes we’d just go straight up and down again but occasionally we got a full tour of the town and surround areas. It kind of makes me feel like a baller in my old age, being able to say I rode a helicopter just cos. Anyways enough rambling, here are a few photos from one of those summer days – sadly no frog kissing caught on film. I wish I could share my fossil collection too but my dad hopefully still has them somewhere. I might share more of these sometime in the future. I love looking at old film photos and its fun to share.

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