Vintage Tuesday: Kodak No. 0 Brownie

no 0 brownie kodak (1)Today I wanted to share with you my newest addition to my vintage camera collection the Kodak No.0 Brownie made between 1928-1935. I bought this lovely and unique camera for $20 just a few weeks ago while antiquing shopping at a market. It uses 127 film, takes 6 x 4 cm exposures is made almost entirely out of cardboard and wood. Below I have a more detailed looked at the camera below because I just love it’s texture and details.

no 0 brownie kodak (2)This is actually the backside of the camera, probably one of the only cameras I own where the back plate is much prettier and detailed than the front.   no 0 brownie kodak (5)The front side of the camera, and although it looks like glass should be there this camera original had none.  You can also see the aperture is open like a photo is being taken. 

no 0 brownie kodak (3)
The top side of the camera where you can find the metal clasp to opening the back of the camera, a viewfinder and the metal tap that gives you unlimited exposure. no 0 brownie kodak (8)The side of the camera where you have the second viewfinder and the simple shutter. As well the  lever/knob for advancing the film. Out of all my cameras this is probably the most decorative film advancement I’ve seen, it’s so cute. no 0 brownie kodak (6) no 0 brownie kodak (7)A peak inside the camera, which is made almost entirely out of wood and velvet.

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Vintage Tuesday: March Finds

march finds (1)Me and Victor have gone all in into antiquing/thrifting every month and have been finding wonderful things to add to our growing oddities, collections and general home decor. Although we have been antiquing far more than going to second hand stores this year but I find those in the winter season are a task. I thought however why not share what we find each month with you, I mean I usually end up sharing a bit on Instagram or a random post so it’d be nice to document the whole month. I may skip some months if I don’t find much but let’s get on with March…

no 0 brownie kodak (1)One of my favourite finds of the month is this adorable  Kodak Brownie No. 0 . One of the best cameras I’ve seen in awhile. It could have been made anywhere between 1914-1935.

vintage finds (2)My adorable creature. I know, I know. Please I get it if this isn’t your thing. To be honest with you, I don’t even know why I like them. I remember my dad having a pelt of a muskrat or beaver when I was younger and being horrified by it. Most taxidermy horrifies me still, but there is something about this one…This isn’t even my first one, I actually have three other ‘cat’-like creatures. The first one I bought because it looked like a Pokemon and very soft. The next two were a set and this one I almost resisted because I didn’t want this to be a ‘thing’.

vintage finds (9) vintage finds (10)View-Master from the 1940s made with bakelite, this was a such a find. I didn’t even know they made anything besides the plastic toy versions of my youth.

vintage finds (3)A Swee-Touch-Nee tea and chocolate tin from around the 1940s. I want to start a collection of tins that look like chests to decorate my bedroom with and keep jewelry in. 

vintage finds (1)Who doesn’t want a vintage metal bell? No? Just me? Alright. I actually stood at the table where they were selling a bunch of these and chimed everyone a few times to find the one with the best sound, which was probably a pretty annoying thing to do, lol.

vintage finds (7) vintage finds (8)A selection of vintage photography including one tintype. The last mounted photograph is so stunning, please enlarge it and look at the details – it’s breath taking.  Most of these are much larger format than I usually find for that era and a few landscapes so a really good haul, the cost was much higher than I usually pay but I couldn’t resist.

vintage finds (4)Victor has started collecting vintage tobacco pocket tins, this is a common standard Prince Albert tin. I think I’ll dedicate a whole post to all the ones he has because he’s actually gotten quite a few since Christmas however this is the only one picked up in March.

vintage finds (11)These camera are from a trip in February but I thought I’d share them anyways. The Baby Brownie camera from 1934-1941 and Instamatic X-15 from 1970-1976, both made by Kodak. Both were a steal at $20 for the Baby Brownie and $10 for the Instamatic.

vintage finds (5)I love this blue album, my mother actually had a bunch of these when I was a kid with pictures of her family in them. This album had a young women and her friends at a horse ranch.

Happy Thrifting! march finds (2)

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Easy Fujifilm Mini Instax Kit

For Christmas this year I ended up making my friend a personalized Fujifilm Instax Kit to go with her new Instax Mini 8 camera. Inside included a bunch of essentials for starting out with an Instax like film, a carrying case and more. This kit is useful for beginners to Instax or even someone who has had it for a long time as these types of things are useful regardless. Now you can buy premade kits from Amazon which are of great saving but sometimes it’s hard to find every element you want and have a fully customized kit but they are worth having a look at. I ended up buying one medium sized kit and keeping some of it for myself and buying additional elements to it to customize it fully for my friend. Below is each piece I thought was worth adding and links on where to find it individually.

Fujifilm Instax Mini Kit

Components:

Fujifilm Mini Instax Kit (1)A neck strap and a set of plastic frames that allow you to stand up 1 instax photo.
Strapes found here & here and frames here.
Continue reading %s

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How To: Organize Your Polaroid Film

how to organize instant film (8)I have a massive amount of Polaroids and over the years I’ve discovered a few ways for organizing and storing them so I thought I’d share. As the film is no longer common these days there is not a lot products available for storing the film and in fact almost all of my organizers were not intended to be used for Polaroid film. A big distinction I want to mention is when  I say Polaroids I am referring to  pack film whether it’s Polaroid pack film or the Fujifilm FP-3000B or FP-100C variety (which is still made) and not the other types of Polaroid film. I’ll also be giving tips on how to store your negatives for pack film, if like me you like to keep them instead of throwing them away.

Organize Your Polaroid Film

how to organize instant film (1)I use every one of these to store and organize my film and negatives at home and when I am out shooting with my vintage Polaroid cameras. Below I break them down in seperate categories of what they are best for and where to find them.

Practical & On the Go

how to organize instant film (5)To be honest this is 90% of what I use for my storage, it’s not the best looking solution but it functions perfectly and for someone who takes a lot of instant photographs it’s very easy to manage and affordable. These are Print File Archival Negative Pages ($10 for 25 pages) which I just put inside a normal 3 ring binder. If you are just storing the film you can put several in each 4×5 pocket because the pack film is actually smaller than the pockets, which also makes for easy removal.  If you want use the pages for display you can fit 8 pieces of film on one page using the front and back side. The clear plastic makes it easy to see and no PVC means its great long term storage. I also use these pages, minus the binder when I am outside shooting. I simply bring along as many pages as I need and slip into my bag. The pages fold up easily so you can get it down to the size of just 1 pocket making it easy to bring along. After I’m done taking a photo on my camera I’ll wait for the film to dry and slip it inside one of the pockets. This makes sure my film stays free of dirt, does not touch anything else, and if it isn’t completely dry the worst it will do is stick to the plastic which in my case has never wrecked the film as you can effortlessly peel them apart. Two things to note when using these pages while on the go is that they will collect dirt over time so you will need to replace them after a while and the pages will not prevent the film bending so you want to make sure you are putting these somewhere flat. In my camera bag I put the pages in between the cushion and the outside part of my bag, folded up together, haven’t had a issue with bent photos yet.

Decorative:

how to organize instant film (7)The classic way or decorative way for storage is a photo album. You can use modern albums or vintage like I have here in the above shot. Vintage Polaroid photo albums are easy to find online and thrift shopping. I picked up this cute 70s album on Etsy for $10 (examples here) and two plain leather ones for a few dollars locally. They provide affordable storage and very charming at the same time. Keep in mind though that Polaroid film comes in many different sizes, for pack film the perfect album has pockets sized 3 ½ x 4 ¼. Most vintage albums will be this size or large on average so if you don’t mind a bit of extra room there isn’t many that will not work, just avoid square shaped pockets as they are not for pack film and likely too small. You can see in the photo above these vintage albums are great as well for holding smaller vintage photography! Modern albums are made for 4×6  film so technically pack film will fit but I prefer the two above options more. For photography portfolios however I like using Portfolio Nobel albums which come in all different sizes, the smallest being 4×6 or 5×7, I simply use photo corners to keep the Polaroids centered.

Negative Storage:

When I am out taking photos with my Polaroid I always like to keep the negative side whether I am shooting in black and white or color. So to make sure I can carefully carry back all negatives home I use a simple plastic sheet protector that you can get cheap from any office supplies store, or Dollar store. It can be folded up neatly in any bag before use and doesn’t take up any space at all.  Once it has negatives in it what it does is protect my bag and camera equipment from getting any of emulsions and developing goo on them, and only takes up as much room as the negatives. The sheet protector is also long enough to fit the whole back side of the Polaroid including the negative and the paper tab without trimming. This is really important especially if you are shooting and don’t have the time, or the ability to let the negatives dry completely. I normally don’t putting them in completely wet but I have, even with two negatives at once facing away from each other and not had an issue. They will stick to the plastic and stay a little moist but if you must…it’s a great way to get them home. The plastic protector will get dirty with the chemicals after several uses but you can wash it or throw away if it’s too far gone.

how to organize instant film (3)Once I am home I like to store the pre-negatives in a plastic container until I have a chance to clean and turn them into proper negatives (only with color pack film – black and white you can scan right away).  I picked up this plastic storage container made for 4×6 photography from an art store for a few dollars, it fits the negatives perfectly without me needing to trim the sides or tab. It can sometimes take a few months for me to process them so it’s nice to have a large container to store them in the meantime. You can also use this for storing the film while out shooting but it takes up a larger area, however it’s great for a long vacation when you want to store film in your suitcase.  For storing the negatives after processing them, I use the same Print File pages again and store in a binder.  I’ve actually wanted to do a tutorial on how to make the back side of pack film into negatives for over a year and never get around to putting all my thoughts together but if you interested and don’t currently do this with yours here one video and another as a guide.

I hope this was helpful! I know when I first started shooting with vintage Polaroid cameras I had no idea how to organize them or store them safely when I was shooting. One time I put my film in-between the pages of my camera manual thinking the film was completely dried and ended up ripping out two pages of the manual as the pages got stuck to the emulsion. Wrecking my vintage manual for the camera and the photo almost entirely, since then I have never trusted pack film to ever be dry no matter how dry it feels. With these organizers I’m really happy with my the safety of my film when I’m shooting and know it’ll get home fine, not to metion how easy it is to find a photo I need in my big binder. If you have any questions about this ask below and please share any tips or suggestions you have!

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Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 Review

fujifilm-instax-mini-90Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 Review

The Instax Mini 90 by Fujifilm is the newest camera in their credit card sized instant photography range. The Mini 90 is a follow up to the almost forgotten Instax Mini 50 series.  What separates the Mini 90 and 50s before it from the colorful Instax 7(s) and 8 is the ability to customize your shot with advance settings while still being point and shoot. Included on the camera are multiple flash settings, basic lighting options, more shooting modes, a timer, and a tripod socket. New to this version alone however are the bulb and double exposure mode and a rechargeable battery which makes this camera the best they come up with for mini instant photography. The 90 also give offers instead of the bright colors and oddly shaped body of the 7 & 8’s a plastic and leather combination that holds and feels more like a camera (a design they’ve termed Neo Classic). Shoot modes include: Standard, Marco, Party, Kids, Landscape, Double Exposure and Bulb with 4 lighting modes of Normal, Light, Lighter, and Dark. As well you have Flash modes: automatic, forced firing, suppressed, and red eye reduction with option to turn on a self-timer for 1 or two shots.

Now for example photos and my review, you can also check out my Instax Film Guide.

Portraitinstax mini toronto (10)

Self-Portraithamicat instax mini film (1)

Catsinstax mini toronto (12)

Group Shotinstax mini toronto (2)

Landscapelomography instax mini film camping vancouver island long beach (15)

Still Life
instax-mini-film-instant-photography

Double Exposure
instax mini toronto (13)

Motionfuji-instax-mini-lake-ontario

Macromacro fail(I have not good example macro shots because they are all fails)

Sunnyspring instax mini film (14)

Cloudyfuji instax mini film lake ontario (3)

Duskhamicat instax mini film (9)

Sunrise/Sunsetfujifilm instax mini film

Direct Sunfall in instax film (5)

Shadefall in instax (2)

Nightfuji-instax-mini-film-15

Flashhalloween instax mini film (5)

Review

At the time I bought it last summer I was really wondering if it was worth it, especially as I really had my eye on the old Mini 50S in piano finish which was the same price as the Mini 8 and had almost identical features to the Mini 90 besides being the older model. However if shoot often with instant film and enjoy having a new camera with accessibility to film – ­­this camera will make you much happier than its contemporaries. Before I start reviewing and dissecting the Instax Mini 90, I want to state that I emphatically believe that it is the best camera option for mini instant film, even beyond the range of Fujifilm’s own cameras (hello Lomo’Instant) and the price is worth it. The only opposition to buying it over the others is personal preference for how it looks , not wanting to buy the higher price point (I bought mine for $60 more than the Instax Mini 8 but slightly cheaper than the Lomo’Instant) and the biggest one, no accessories (additional lens types and colourful cases). Like with any Instax film camera there is plenty of faults you can find with all of them including manual options, ability to use in all situation, and the viewfinder in name a few. If you want my opinion the best instant camera would be a vintage Polaroid camera compatible with current FujifilmFP100-C film but we are talking about cameras that use mini Instax film so I will digress. In my experience the Instax Mini 90 is the strongest out of them all and there is no element to it that is weaker or inferior to any other model when it comes to its technology.

Modes

The modes works well and allow you to use the camera in almost any situation. My favourite modes are the Party, Landscape and standard which I use constantly and get great results. My least favourite is Macro which I’ve never successful gotten a clear shot with despite trying various distance and subject matter. My second least favourite is Multiple Exposure, I know it might be hard to believe that someone who posts bi-weekly double exposures doesn’t enjoy this mode but I don’t. The results it gives me are easily over exposed with little details and I just can’t get behind it. I also not one to do typical multiple exposures so maybe the average person would still love this (I know it’s why I decided to buy the camera in the end). The other modes, Kids and Bulb I never use – I don’t know why I just don’t. One thing I will mention while I’m talking about the modes is the fact that Party and Kids for some reason do not allow you to shoot with no flash on. It infuriates me because unless I’m indoors or its night I mostly shoot with no flash and for them to arbitrarily not allow you, pisses me off especially since I use Party mode a lot. Although it can be said that the Mini 7/8’s don’t even have real modes so my negatives comments you have to take into perspective anything is better than nothing.

Lighting

The automatic Normal lighting is really good and versatile although it can be tricky as I’ve noticed at certain times in the afternoon you tend you get blue tinted photos for some reason. On bright sunny days when you are not shooting in shadows I recommend Dark as Normal will always be too bright. As for Light it’s good to use when shooting in shadows, but I haven’t had good experience using it in the afternoon as the sun is going down as it tends to make images more blurry and oddly have little contrast. Lighter is useless and blurry and has over exposed all dark situations I’ve used it on. Keep in mind I am referring to shooting by the hand as most people I am assume are not shooting with tripods. The two lighter options would drastically improve if used on a tripod as my biggest concern is the how blurry they are (I haven’t not tried this so I might be wrong). Lastly DON’T point at the sun; you will always get a black hole that ruins the shot.

Flash

For the flash modes as I’ve stated I solo try to shoot with the flash off. However I have used it at night and indoor and the default flash and red eye flash work great. It’s powerful and doesn’t wash out too much if things are at a good distance. However you want to make sure your subjects are not too close, I’d say anything an arm reach away (sorry all selfies will be over exposed ghosts). As for Non-flash I love, I do not trust any camera to know when the lighting is okay for flash or not, one reason why the Mini 90 is amazing because you can turn that off. But by default the automatic flash will be on and if you accidently leave it on, or are in the two modes that you can’t turn off the flash it will be a drunk fool and shoot in the middle of a sunny day just because. Automatic flash is the worst thing in any camera, full stop. Another peeve of mine is that I have to reselect the flash mode anytime I change the shooting mode, it’s annoying and it leads to that automatic flash being on when I didn’t realize and blinding someone during the middle of the day.

Normal mode – flash went of automatically fall in instax flash

No Flashfall in instax film (4)

Viewfinder

The viewfinder for me is the most frustrating part of the camera. I feel like I have a better time shooting if I ignored it completely. However when you are spending so much money per shot, it’d be nice to actually be able to frame it and what you see in the viewfinder is never what you’ll get. I’ve even started to try and figure out how to compensate for it and that just ends me up with worse shots. Now I’ve used the other versions and they are worse but I have to point it out because I’d love a true viewfinder and it’s a sour point in all the Instax cameras.

Other Features

One thing on the camera I cannot fault is the battery. For starts it has a rechargeable battery which I could just stop there as that’s already such an improvement. However not only do you no longer have to buy and carry around replacement batteries that weigh down you and your camera but the battery is amazing. I’ve owned the camera for a year and a half and charged it twice; once when it arrived and again a second time this summer. Now I don’t use the flash that often but it blows my mind that it lasts that long. The camera also has ‘selfie’ mirror on the front which is just the highly reflective shutter button that I didn’t even notice was there (I now no longer wonder why all mine turn out framed so badly). Speaking of things I didn’t notice, there are two shutter buttons on the camera. The top shutter is in the convention shutter button area and the second is on the front acting as the mirror and with the power switch around it – who knew? I use the one on the top exclusively and forgot the other even existed until now. Holding the camera now to test it I don’t know what position I’d be holding the camera in where that button would be more useful and comfortable that the other one. Luckily for me I’ve never accidently used it so it’s still a good design in my books as it’s there for people who want it but it doesn’t get in the way either. Other random features are the back mode screen and the film counter which do their job well. Only thing I can note is the film counter has on occasion told me the incorrect number of film available but that was after the camera was jammed in my bag and took 5 shots of the inside and one other time when I opened the back while having power on the camera. There is also a tripod mount that I have not used but it’s one of those musts and not enough toy cameras have one so I appreciate it. It also came with a very nice, fashionable and long leather neck strap that I love, and you can change it out for any other type of strap like a hand one. It’s also really light which probably in part has to do with not using batteries for power, and being the smallest of Instax camera. The size of it also makes it easy to fit into any of my smaller bags, you can load up with packs of film and still have plenty of room.

10 More Instax Mini 90 Photos:

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Vintage Tuesday: Argoflex Seventy-Five & Baby Brownie Special

Vintage Tuesday Argoflex Seventy-Five and Kodak Baby Brownie Special

Today I wanted to profile my two newest cameras that I just added to my collection in October, the Argoflex Seventy-Five and the Baby Brownie Special. I picked up the Argoflex Seventy-Five for $20 at a flea market along with it’s original leather case and strap and the Baby Brownie Special at a church bazaar for $20 as well. The Seventy-Five is a Bakelite camera put out by Argus made between 1949 to 1964 and like many cameras from around that perioid it is a fake TLR camera and used 620 medium format film. It has a bright viewfinder that is great for look through and to do viewfinder photography. On top of that I loved the simple design of the front of the camera even though I have a very similiar designed Kodak camera. The main reason I bought it was because I do not own any Argus camereas and I thought with the case included it was a steal.  My second camera, is by far one of the cutest cameras I’ve even seen – it’s just so tiny. The Baby Brownie by Kodak is a Bakelite camera that was produced from 1938 to 1954.  It shoots in medium format on 127 film and includes absoleyly no settings, it’s as point and click as you can go. It’s size and lightness felt unique from all the other cameras from around that time so I couldn’t resist. I am so intrigued to see how it shoots, because if it’s any good – it’ll fit in my travel bags so well. On that note I will mention  both cameras use film that is not produced anymore however you can use other types of film in them and simply resize or use original spools (tutorial here for 127 film conversion).

Kodak Baby Brownie

kodak baby brownie

Argoflex Seventy-Five

argoflex seventy-five

A look at the leather case for the camera and a look through it’s viewfinder.Argus Seventy-Five (1) Argus Seventy-Five (2)

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Vintage Tuesday: MF2000T Motor Drive Twin Len Reflex

MF2000T Motor Drive Twin Len Reflex (1)This giant and strange looking beast of a camera is the MF2000T Motor Drive Twin Len Reflex which I picked up for $10 at a garage sale in the summer. Due to its black plastic body and general look and feel I’d say this was a camera from the 1980’s-1990’s era, however since I am unable to really find any information about this camera online I can’t say for sure. I normally don’t go for cameras of this type/time period however the extremely low price and the fact that it’s so unique I had to grab it. The  camera features a viewfinder to the right of the lens that allows you to see an accurate view of what your shooting and has a much different look than typical twin lens reflex cameras (although I don’t know if that’s a good thing – this camera is very heavy and bulking).  The camera also boosts a very loud motor drive that winds the film for you automatically. Beyond that it’s a fairly standard basic camera with four apertures settings and automatic focus. I’m going to try it out soon and see what I get, I don’t expect much but it’s an interesting camera none the less, lol.

MF2000T Motor Drive Twin Len Reflex (2)MF2000T Motor Drive Twin Len Reflex (3)Never trust cats when taking photos, I don’t know why but she always find what I’m shooting the most interesting thing going on and rushes over to check it out/sit on it.

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Fall in Instax

fall in instax film (2)Now that it’s autumn here in Montreal me and Victor have been trying to hit the road as much as possible before the snow and -40 weather comes.  I usually travel light when biking so my Instax camera has become my go to ride along camera since I can simply stuff it into a small bag and it weighs nothing. Today I’m sharing a  few shots taken during a few different trips around our area this weekend and last. All taken with my Instax Mini 90 with Instax comic film and Instax Alice in Wonderland film.

fall in instax film (4)fall in instax film (6)The start of the journey to Parc de la Cite-du-Havren on the edge of Vieux-Montreal viewing the Clocktower.fall in instax film (2)fall in instax film (5)fall in instax film (3)The Parc de la Cite-du-Havren has wonderful views of downtown and Vieux-Montreal besides just being a nice green space.  There is also a bike path that goes around it so it’s 360 views of the river. It was the first time we’ve been there, on a complete whim too after Victor decided he wanted to check it out.
fall in instax film (7)fall in instax (1)
The above right photo was taken from our walkway of Butter while we were heading out this weekend on another small trip to Parc Lafontaine. I wasn’t sold on the Alice in Wonderland instax film at first but I quiet like it seeing it in person and it’s very suitable for autumn and Halloween. fall in instax (2)
fall in instax (5)The below photo wasn’t taken on either of these trips, we went on a ride to Mont-Royal last week as the sun was setting so I didn’t end up taking more photos besides this one of Victor eatting polish sausage from our favourite food truck.
fall in instax film (1)

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Vintage Tuesday: Looking Back

family vintage photography

When I look back at 1900s photography it’s always with great fondness and admiration, however it’s a whole another thing to ‘know’ the people in the photos. I’ve never really had a close relationship with my family, especially my grandparents on either side so I really missed out being able to go through their photo albums and in their later years discovering more about them as an adult. The only impression about my grandmother’s side of the family besides knowing they were German famers in Alberta who lived in a mostly Ukraine populated area was the cameo portraits my grandmother had in her room of her great grandparents I believe. I loved look at them so much because they were very striking and regal and very much of a moment of history, that moment before photography became the way we captured ourselves instead of oil on canvas. Much to my delight I was given a few scans of that side of the family, dating from the early 1900s, like the above photo of my grandmother’s grandparents. There aren’t many photos from the war times so the ones below will be from the 1940s to 1950s but I thought I’d show the great photography of my one side of family today.

family vintage photography 1940s (7)family vintage photography 1940s (6)
My grandmother, who is in most of these photos is a small child with her older sister Trudie and other family members like her parents. Mostly taken in Southern Alberta where they lived.
family vintage photography 1940s (17)family vintage photography 1940s (16)family vintage photography 1940s (4)family vintage photography 1940s (1)family vintage photography 1940s (14)family vintage photography 1940s (10)family vintage photography 1940s (9)83.Mother & Mr. Fuchsfamily vintage photography 1940s (5)family vintage photography 1940s (8)77.Grade 5, Oct 25, 1950family vintage photography 1940s (2)family vintage photography 1940s (11)family vintage photography 1940s (3)family vintage photography 1940s (13)family vintage photography 1940s (12)

I will definitely be sharing some more another time, as I love these. The one of my grandmother and the bear that close is surreal. She always love camping and I can see why now. Let me know in the comments below if you have any great photos to remember your grandparents or great grandparents by.

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Vintage Tuesday: Long Beach in Polaroids

Long Beach on Vancouver Island is one of the few places in Canada I’ve been that feels like nowhere else.  Situated in the Pacific Rim area of the island sandwiched between two small holiday towns (Tofino and Uculelet) and surrounded by the rainforest, it’s pretty magical. Not to mention there is nothing between it and the raw span of the Pacific ocean that reaches all the way to Japan. It feels like a raw untapped environment, the bear lockers as well certainly back that up. The highway trip there however might persuade you not to visit; we twisted and turned constantly through the mountains for a few hours to get to this secluded area of the island. Even after only being there twice in my lifetime once as a kid and an adult I feel a connection with the place. If you ever get the chance or plan a trip to Vancouver Island – I’d say jump on it. These were all taken with my Polaroid Super Shooter Shot using Fujifilm FP-100C film instant film.

long beach in polaroids (6)long beach in polaroids (14) long beach in polaroids (3)long beach in polaroids (4)long beach in polaroids (12)long beach in polaroids (11)long beach in polaroids (15)long beach in polaroids (18)long beach in polaroids (1)long beach in polaroids (10)A great day at the beach, enjoying the waves and landscape.

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