Vintage Tuesday: Argoflex Seventy-Five & Baby Brownie Special

Vintage Tuesday Argoflex Seventy-Five and Kodak Baby Brownie Special

Today I wanted to profile my two newest cameras that I just added to my collection in October, the Argoflex Seventy-Five and the Baby Brownie Special. I picked up the Argoflex Seventy-Five for $20 at a flea market along with it’s original leather case and strap and the Baby Brownie Special at a church bazaar for $20 as well. The Seventy-Five is a Bakelite camera put out by Argus made between 1949 to 1964 and like many cameras from around that perioid it is a fake TLR camera and used 620 medium format film. It has a bright viewfinder that is great for look through and to do viewfinder photography. On top of that I loved the simple design of the front of the camera even though I have a very similiar designed Kodak camera. The main reason I bought it was because I do not own any Argus camereas and I thought with the case included it was a steal.  My second camera, is by far one of the cutest cameras I’ve even seen – it’s just so tiny. The Baby Brownie by Kodak is a Bakelite camera that was produced from 1938 to 1954.  It shoots in medium format on 127 film and includes absoleyly no settings, it’s as point and click as you can go. It’s size and lightness felt unique from all the other cameras from around that time so I couldn’t resist. I am so intrigued to see how it shoots, because if it’s any good – it’ll fit in my travel bags so well. On that note I will mention  both cameras use film that is not produced anymore however you can use other types of film in them and simply resize or use original spools (tutorial here for 127 film conversion).

Kodak Baby Brownie

kodak baby brownie

Argoflex Seventy-Five

argoflex seventy-five

A look at the leather case for the camera and a look through it’s viewfinder.Argus Seventy-Five (1) Argus Seventy-Five (2)

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Vintage Tuesday: MF2000T Motor Drive Twin Len Reflex

MF2000T Motor Drive Twin Len Reflex (1)This giant and strange looking beast of a camera is the MF2000T Motor Drive Twin Len Reflex which I picked up for $10 at a garage sale in the summer. Due to its black plastic body and general look and feel I’d say this was a camera from the 1980’s-1990’s era, however since I am unable to really find any information about this camera online I can’t say for sure. I normally don’t go for cameras of this type/time period however the extremely low price and the fact that it’s so unique I had to grab it. The  camera features a viewfinder to the right of the lens that allows you to see an accurate view of what your shooting and has a much different look than typical twin lens reflex cameras (although I don’t know if that’s a good thing – this camera is very heavy and bulking).  The camera also boosts a very loud motor drive that winds the film for you automatically. Beyond that it’s a fairly standard basic camera with four apertures settings and automatic focus. I’m going to try it out soon and see what I get, I don’t expect much but it’s an interesting camera none the less, lol.

MF2000T Motor Drive Twin Len Reflex (2)MF2000T Motor Drive Twin Len Reflex (3)Never trust cats when taking photos, I don’t know why but she always find what I’m shooting the most interesting thing going on and rushes over to check it out/sit on it.

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Vintage Tuesday: Long Beach in Polaroids

Long Beach on Vancouver Island is one of the few places in Canada I’ve been that feels like nowhere else.  Situated in the Pacific Rim area of the island sandwiched between two small holiday towns (Tofino and Uculelet) and surrounded by the rainforest, it’s pretty magical. Not to mention there is nothing between it and the raw span of the Pacific ocean that reaches all the way to Japan. It feels like a raw untapped environment, the bear lockers as well certainly back that up. The highway trip there however might persuade you not to visit; we twisted and turned constantly through the mountains for a few hours to get to this secluded area of the island. Even after only being there twice in my lifetime once as a kid and an adult I feel a connection with the place. If you ever get the chance or plan a trip to Vancouver Island – I’d say jump on it. These were all taken with my Polaroid Super Shooter Shot using Fujifilm FP-100C film instant film.

long beach in polaroids (6)long beach in polaroids (14) long beach in polaroids (3)long beach in polaroids (4)long beach in polaroids (12)long beach in polaroids (11)long beach in polaroids (15)long beach in polaroids (18)long beach in polaroids (1)long beach in polaroids (10)A great day at the beach, enjoying the waves and landscape.

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Vintage Finds

On the weekend me and Victor went to check out one of the only fairs we seem to consistently go it, OldWig’s Vente Vintage Sale which is a bi-annual fair here in Montreal for mostly clothing and accessories but also homeware. I think it’s the 3rd time, maybe the 4th time we’ve went to check it out and the last few times the stuff I am mostly interested in seemed sparse so I don’t know if I will go next time it rolls around. It also doesn’t help that we found that flea market before Chistmas and all I think about is its giant rows of stores with anything a hoarder could imagine to fill their house with. The shops for OldWig’s fair do change every event and this time we did go on the last day, so maybe it just a combination of things but I only found 2 things I wanted to buy.

vintage finds (1)The first was this crazy weird camera called the MF2000T Motor Drive, which is a really shitty name, no? It looks like one of those massive 80’s camera that is pretty much never going to be a collector item to anyone. The reason I liked it? Well it has an old school viewfinder in a modernish camera and it has a motor to control the film advancement. It also didn’t hurt that the seller hearing me hum and ha about it and dropped the cheap price of $25 down to $15. As he said “Sunday prices”! I can’t wait to actually shoot with this camera and think it’s a steal now that I have done some research on it. Will share with you more about this camera in a post of its own at a later date!  The second thing I bought is a 80s classic, the View-Master in red for $12. I actually just acquired from Star Trek cartoon reels for a View-Master last month for $2 and was on the lookout to pick one up so I was beyond delighted. I hope I can thrift more reels as right now we just have those and the SpongeBob Squarepants one that came with it. It’s kind of one of those items you just display on your bookshelf for shits and giggles. I do hear you can make you own reels however that idea was quickly dispelled by one quick google search as it’s very expensive.

vintage finds

If you want to see my previous OldWig finds click here.

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Double Exposure: Polaroids

I absolutely love taking double exposure with vintage Polaroid land cameras, although not always successful it’s really fun to test and see what you can get. I’ve shared these photos before but wanted to reshare them as after a year of taking multiple exposures with instant film these are my personally most successful. I find using trees as one of the shots usually results in an interesting result however putting this post together I realized how often I use them and really want to explore this summer on using more variety. I’d love to do a series of double exposures with graffiti from around Montreal so hopefully I will get a chance to explore that idea more. Man it feels like a really long time since I’ve actually used my Polaroid Colorpack or Super Shot cameras, I really need to pick up more film and get back into shooting. Hope you enjoy the shots.

double exposure polaroid (2) polaroid double exposure (3) double exposure polaroid (5) polaroid double exposure (2) polaroid double exposure double exposure polaroid (4) double exposure polaroid (6) polaroid double exposure (4) polaroid double exposure (1)

 

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Vintage Tuesday: Polaroid Emulsion Lifts

Last month marked the first time I ever tried to do Polaroid emulsion lifts (did a little DIY about it here) and I ended up  with a lot of them because they are so fun to do and play around with.  I absolutely love the idea of transferring my instant photography into something else and try making art out of them. Today I wanted to show you all of the ones I did while trying it out. They are on various surfaces from watercolor paper, canvas board to wood. I still haven’t completed them and put the finishing touches on them as I’m unsure of which ones I will end up keeping but I love them so much in their raw state as well. I will be sure to show you more next time I do them. Currently I don’t have any more Fujifilm that I would like to emulsion lift but I want to start shooting in the Spring again so I’m sure there is more to follow.

fujifilm emulsion lift (4) polaroid emulsion lifts (3) polaroid emulsion lifts (2) polaroid emulsion lifts (9) polaroid emulsion lifts (4) polaroid emulsion lifts (14) polaroid emulsion lifts (10) polaroid emulsion lifts (6) polaroid emulsion lifts (12)polaroid emulsion lifts (1) Continue reading %s

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Through the Viewfinder

I’d love to do a series with the Kodak Duaflex called “Through the Viewfinder” where I explore various places around Montreal and elsewhere if possible. I love looking through this camera’s viewfinder in particular over all my other viewfinder style cameras and usually find myself when I bring it with me staring through it while walking around – not even to take photos but just to experience the world through its lens (I know I’m weird). I really want to take movies of what that’s like but it’s a bit hard to do since I’d have to have the Kodak Duaflex on a tripod and also my Nikon D7000 on a tripod…while moving. Otherwise it would just be horrible shaky. Today’s photo are actually free style where I am holding both cameras in opposite hands and that already makes it really tricky when trying to eliminate the glare on the viewfinder. I should probably take more photos and at least try when I replace my broken tripod to see. The photos today were taken during a short walk in the Vieux-Port earlier this month. If you want to see more I’ve done in the past with a tripod and the same camera, here, here, here and here!through the viewfinder (4) through the viewfinder (8) through the viewfinder (7) through the viewfinder (12)through the viewfinder (11) through the viewfinder (16) through the viewfinder (1) through the viewfinder (2)

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Vintage Tuesday: Polaroid Land Model 80A

Polaroid Land 80A (5)

Polaroid Land Model 80A

Today I’m sharing with you my vintage Polaroid Land Model 80A camera that was made from 1957-59 by the Polaroid Company. The Model 80a land camera uses Type 30 series roll film that hasn’t been produced since the 1960s. It’s a metal and plastic camera with a glass lens and three shutter modes 1/25, 1/100 and bulb. The 80a has 3 exposures mode that use the EV scale system instead of the usual f/ stops but it translates to f/8, f/11 and f/16. It also has a viewfinder at the top of the camera and has a metal cover that extends to exposure the lens in an accordion style. To take photos you use the metal tab to the right of the lens when extended. Like other accordion cameras it has a metal stand that extends down when the bellows have been moved out so you can balance the camera vertically. It also has a hot shoe flash which isn’t common in many Polaroid cameras. I don’t know if the camera will work with modern hot shoe flash as I haven’t tried. The main reason I actually bought this camera is because of the amazing bellows and the lens plate that is shaped much like juke box (or at least I think so). It has a really unique retro vibe about it that I just had to have it even though it can’t be used any more to take instant photography. There is a tutorial here, that shows you how to convert it to use 120 film but I doubt I will ever do that as this camera is a beast (it weighs so much) and I’m not a big fan of permanently destroying a camera even though there will never be film available for it again. In fact it’s one of the few cameras I own that isn’t able to be used anymore but again who could resist its amazing design?

Polaroid Land 80A (8) Polaroid Land 80A (3)Polaroid Land 80A (7)Polaroid Land 80A (2) Polaroid Land 80A (6)I love the inside of the Polaroid 80a.

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Vintage Tuesday: Agfa PD16 Clipper

agfa pd16 clipper (2)Agfa PF16 Clipper

I wanted to get back in my Vintage Tuesday by showing you my 2nd newest acquisition the Agfa PD16 Clipper that I picked up on Etsy in the spring. This camera was first introduced in 1928 by Agfa and made in New York State. The Agfa company had just recently been acquired by Ansco when this camera came out so you can find the exact same model of this camera under the name Ansco Clipper.  It’s a metal and plastic folding medium format camera that uses now discontinued 616 film and has a fixed focus of over 6 feet to infinity. The shutter is a red metal lever to the right of the lens and it has the shutter speed of 1/60 second and has a bulb mode for infinite exposure.  Although considered a folding camera, this camera is pretty unique and actually had a lens that pulls out by pressing in the metal tabs on the middle of the camera to slide out the lens and extend the front of the camera. The unique part of that is instead of bellows it just a metal square.
agfa pd16 clipper (3)agfa pd16 clipper (4)
The above two photos show you what the camera looks like once extended out. As well you can see the metal tap in the 2nd photo at the top of the lens that turns the shutter into bulb mode, simply pull up. The top of the camera is plastic and has 1 knob to wind the film. It also has a typical viewfinder over the top of the lens and a little stand to hold the camera lens when extended plus a hand strap on the left side of the camera that conveniently covers the switch to open up the back of the camera.  Other than that the camera has no other functionality or specifics but I’d like to note its pretty light camera to hold and would be easy to travel with due to its compactness and weight. I haven’t taken photos with this camera yet as I need to convert 120 film onto a 616 metal spool and have had trouble doing so but I’m really excited to try it out as it’s one of my oldest cameras.

agfa pd16 clipper (5)agfa pd16 clipper (1)agfa pd16 clipperThe last shot is kinda of random but I brought my Agfa Clipper on a bike ride because I wanted to take these photos somewhere more interesting than my back porch but it got too dark too fast. I love this shot of me holding it above the river though.

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Vintage Tuesday: Metro-Flex & Brownie Fiesta Kodak

metro-flex amd brownieToday I am going to take a closer look at two of my newest vintage cameras the Metro-Flex and the Kodak Brownie Fiesta that I like to call my ‘minis’ because they are just so darn small and compact.

Brownie Fiesta Camera

The Brownie Fiesta is a 127 film camera made in the 1960s by the Eastman Kodak Company all over the world. It’s a plastic fixed focus camera of f/11 and the shutter speed of 1/40second. There are a few variations of this camera either as a later model or due from the country manufacturing it. I have the original model made between 1962 and 1965 with the plastic silver face plate, viewfinder and hand strap but without flash capability. I chose this version because of unique shape and the shiny front texture. It’s also the smallest vintage camera I have currently in my collection, fitting in the palm of my hand and made with super lightweight plastic. There are so many different Kodak Brownies but this one has a lot of charm, I haven’t had the chance to use it yet but hope to soon.

kodak fiesta camera (3) kodak fiesta camera (4)

Metro-Flex

The Metro-Flex camera is a Bakelite pseudo reflex camera made in the 1940s by the Metropolitan Industries Company. This American camera uses 127 film and creates half frame exposures. There isn’t much information about this camera available nowadays except that it has a close resemblance to the Clix-O-Flex (made by the same company) and that there are only three styles of the camera available. I chose to get the version with the textured Bakelite because I just love the uniqueness of it over the other two styles which were very typical of camera during that time. This camera has absolutely no setting options except bulb mode (which they call TIME) and it is also capable of double exposures. I love that it’s a half frame camera as well however it’s hard to tell because I have only used 35 film inside mine. The 127 film is no longer being made but using 127 film spools the camera can work with 35 film or cut down 120 film. I am curious to know what the images would look like on the original film type, if you want to see my photographs taken with this camera click here!

metro-flex (1) metro-flex metro-flex (3)metro-flex (4)
My viewfinder is very cloudy, example photo below of what it’s like to look through it. Don’t know if it’s an issue with the inside of the glass being dirty or the normal view of the viewfinder.

metro-flex (5)

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