Vintage Tuesday

autographic junior, kodak autographic junior no 1aThis beautiful guy is a Kodak Autographic Junior No 1A, made in 1914 by the Eastman Kodak Company in either New York or Toronto. Its a folding camera meaning that it has bowels that expand, and the autographic part of the name is because there is a place on the back of the camera that will open allowing you to use a stylus to write directly on the film. This fantastic camera I got off of Etsy has the stylus still and after purchasing it I was able to find the leather case for it as well. I am so charmed by this camera and it appears to be in working condition, which means hopefully I can convert film for it soon. It takes 116 film which is not made any more but I’ve been playing around with re-spooling 120 film for quiet a few other cameras and its very easy when you have the right spools. I wish to pick up another Autographic camera soon just for display, one I don’t mind getting a tad dusty on the bowels as its really just absolutely beautiful.I bought the leather case for it afterwards from a different shop, it has black velvet on the inside and this metal clasp that is engraved with company logo. It’s such a wonderful camera!autographic juniorautographic juniorautographic juniorautographic juniorautographic juniorautographic juniorautographic juniorautographic junior, kodak autographic junior no 1a

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Vintage Tuesday

Kodak Brownie Six-20 (9)

These giant prints were taken with the Kodak Brownie Target Six-20 which is considered a type of box camera and has been kicking around my house for a little less than a year. I picked this guy up at an antique store in Quebec City while on vacation with Victor last summer. He actually bought it for me as a present and I am so happy to have it. It takes 620 film which means I had to convert 120 film to be able to use the camera. I followed a few different tutorials on how to make 120 film become as small as 620. It didn’t look that difficult but I found half way through my roll that my film got stuck and I had to start using pliers to move the frames…and then at some point the pliers stopped working and I had to open up the camera and expose half the roll and manually roll it up to save the film that was already exposed because the film advance would not work. So I learned my lesson to just re-roll 120 film onto a 620 spool and leave the converting behind me. lol (at least converting 120 rolls with nail clippers to be the size of 620 that is). All the shots I got are from a trip to Jacques Cartier Bridge which you may see a lot of this summer as we’ve went a few times already and it’s a really fun walk from our house. I hope to pick up another type of box camera soon as they are lovely and now that I know this guy is in working condition I’ll happy take him out again and this time get a few more shots then this!

Kodak Brownie Six-20 (21)Kodak Brownie Six-20 (15) Kodak Brownie Six-20 (16)Kodak Brownie Six-20 (20)Kodak Brownie Six-20 (10)

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Vintage Tuesday

kodak electric 8, citizen erasedI wanted to share one of my film cameras from my collection with you. The Kodak Electric 8 made in 1963 makes silent movies with Super8 film. The film is easy find online and is around $20 per roll, I even happen to have the film for it in my fridge.  Currently I am looking for the perfect opportunity to use it. I am so excited to test it out but its really hard to get Super 8 film developed. Researching all the photo labs in Montreal have come up with nothing, one just stopped 1 year ago which is just my luck, lol however sending away your film is possible. I love seeing this camera on my shelf and once I find that perfect moment to capture I’ll share my results.

kodak electric 8, citizen erasedkodak electric 8, citizen erased

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